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What is
Hyperopia?

Hyperopia, commonly known as farsightedness, is a refractive error of the eye where distant objects can be seen more clearly than close-up ones. In hyperopia, the light entering the eye focuses behind the retina rather than directly on it. This occurs because the eyeball is too short, or the cornea has too little curvature.

Risk Factors

Symptoms

People with hyperopia often experience difficulty focusing on close objects, such as reading or working on a computer. The blurriness tends to be more noticeable for near tasks.

Straining the eyes while performing tasks that require near vision, such as reading or using a computer, is common. This can lead to discomfort and fatigue.

Eyestrain associated with hyperopia may contribute to headaches, particularly after prolonged periods of close-up work.

Individuals with hyperopia might feel general discomfort or aching in the eyes, especially when engaged in tasks that require sustained close focus.

People with hyperopia might find it challenging to read small print or see details on objects at a close distance.

Squinting is a natural response to hyperopia, as it temporarily changes the shape of the eye to help bring objects into focus.

Prolonged efforts to compensate for hyperopia can lead to eye fatigue and overall tiredness.

It’s important to note that hyperopia is a common refractive error, and many people live with it without significant issues. Regular eye examinations are crucial for detecting and monitoring hyperopia and other vision conditions. An eye care professional can determine the most suitable corrective measures based on an individual’s eye health, lifestyle, and preferences.

Treatment Types

Eyeglasses
This non-surgical approach involves the use of specially designed rigid contact lenses that are worn overnight to reshape the cornea temporarily. During the day, individuals can experience improved vision without the need for glasses or contact lenses.

Soft or rigid gas permeable contact lenses can be used to correct hyperopia. Contact lenses sit directly on the eye’s surface and provide an alternative to eyeglasses. They may be preferred for cosmetic reasons or for specific activities where glasses may be less convenient.

For individuals with both hyperopia and presbyopia (difficulty focusing on close objects due to aging), bifocal or multifocal lenses can provide clear vision at different distances. These lenses have multiple prescription powers to address both conditions.

Surgical procedures can permanently reshape the cornea, allowing light to focus correctly on the retina. The most common type of refractive surgery for hyperopia is LASIK (Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis), where a laser is used to remove corneal tissue.

In certain cases, especially when refractive surgery is not suitable, phakic IOLs can be implanted in the eye to correct hyperopia. Unlike cataract surgery, these lenses are placed without removing the eye’s natural lens.

This non-surgical approach involves the use of specially designed rigid contact lenses that are worn overnight to reshape the cornea temporarily. During the day, individuals can experience improved vision without the need for glasses or contact lenses.

The choice of treatment depends on factors such as the degree of hyperopia, age, lifestyle, and personal preferences. Regular eye examinations are crucial for diagnosing hyperopia and determining the most suitable treatment options. It’s important to consult with an eye care professional to discuss individual needs and make informed decisions about the most appropriate corrective measures.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is hyperopia?

Hyperopia, or farsightedness, is a refractive error where distant objects can be seen more clearly than close-up ones. It occurs when light entering the eye focuses behind the retina rather than directly on it

Symptoms of hyperopia include blurred close-up vision, eyestrain, headaches, eye discomfort, difficulty seeing up close, squinting, and fatigue.

An eye care professional can diagnose hyperopia through a comprehensive eye examination, which may include visual acuity tests, refraction tests, and other assessments of eye health.

Hyperopia can be treated with eyeglasses, contact lenses, bifocal/multifocal lenses, refractive surgery (e.g., LASIK), phakic intraocular lenses, and orthokeratology.

If symptoms persist or worsen, it’s advisable to consult with an eye care specialist for a comprehensive eye examination to rule out underlying eye conditions and receive personalized recommendations.

Hyperopia is often present from birth and is influenced by genetic factors. While it may not be preventable, regular eye examinations can help detect and manage hyperopia early.