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What is
Myopia?

Myopia, commonly known as nearsightedness, is a common refractive error where distant objects appear blurry, while close objects can be seen clearly. This occurs when light entering the eye focuses in front of the retina rather than directly on it. Myopia is a prevalent vision condition and can be corrected with various treatment options.

Risk Factors

Symptoms

Objects at a distance appear blurry or out of focus.

Struggling to focus on distant objects can lead to eyestrain, characterized by discomfort, fatigue, or aching around the eyes.

Struggling to focus on distant objects can lead to eyestrain, characterized by discomfort, fatigue, or aching around the eyes.

Myopia can affect performance in activities that require clear vision of distant objects, such as reading the board in a classroom or viewing presentations on a screen.

Individuals with myopia may squint to try to see distant objects more clearly.

Prolonged efforts to see distant objects can result in overall eye fatigue.

It’s important to note that myopia symptoms are typically related to difficulty seeing objects at a distance. Close-up vision is usually clear for individuals with myopia. These symptoms may vary among individuals, and some people may not experience noticeable symptoms, especially if the myopia is mild.

Treatment Types

Eyeglasses

Concave lenses are prescribed to help focus light directly on the retina, correcting blurry distance vision.

Concave lenses are prescribed to help focus light directly on the retina, correcting blurry distance vision.

Procedures like LASIK and PRK reshape the cornea to correct myopia permanently. These are generally recommended for stable prescriptions in adults.

Low-dose atropine eye drops may be used to slow the progression of myopia, particularly in children.

These specially designed contact lenses are worn overnight to temporarily reshape the cornea and provide clear vision during the day.

It’s essential to consult with an eye care professional to determine the most suitable treatment for individual needs. Regular eye examinations are crucial for monitoring the progression of myopia and making any necessary adjustments to the prescribed treatment. Early detection and appropriate management can help address myopia effectively.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is myopia?

Myopia, commonly known as nearsightedness, is a refractive error where distant objects appear blurry, while close objects can be seen clearly. It occurs when light entering the eye focuses in front of the retina.

Common symptoms of myopia include blurry distance vision, difficulty seeing objects at a distance, squinting, eyestrain, headaches, and eye fatigue.

While myopia is influenced by genetic and environmental factors, spending time outdoors, taking breaks from close-up work, and maintaining good eye health practices may help reduce the risk of myopia, especially in children.

An eye care professional can diagnose myopia through a comprehensive eye examination, which includes visual acuity tests, refraction tests, and a thorough assessment of eye health.

Myopia can progress, especially during childhood and adolescence. Regular eye examinations are important to monitor changes in prescription and adjust treatment accordingly.

Treatment options include eyeglasses, contact lenses, bifocal or multifocal lenses, refractive surgery (LASIK, PRK), phakic intraocular lenses, and orthokeratology. The choice of treatment depends on individual factors and preferences.