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What is
Styes?

A stye, also known as a hordeolum, is a common and usually harmless eyelid infection or inflammation. Styes can be painful, red, and tender, often resembling a pimple or boil on the eyelid. They can occur on the outer or inner part of the eyelid and are typically caused by a bacterial infection, often involving the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

Risk Factors

Symptoms

The affected area becomes red and swollen.

Styes can be tender and painful, especially when touched.

Excessive tearing or a sensation of something in the eye.

Photophobia or sensitivity to light may occur.

A visible lump or pimple on the eyelid, often with a white or yellow center.

It’s important to note that a stye can occur on either the outer or inner part of the eyelid. External styes involve hair follicles and sweat glands along the eyelid’s edge, while internal styes affect the oil glands (meibomian glands) on the eyelid’s inner surface.

Treatment Types

Warm Compresses

Applying warm compresses to the affected eyelid for 10-15 minutes several times a day can help reduce swelling and encourage drainage.

Keeping the eyelids clean and avoiding the use of eye makeup during the infection can prevent further irritation.

It’s crucial not to squeeze or pop a stye, as it can lead to the spread of infection and worsen the condition.

In some cases, a healthcare professional may prescribe antibiotic ointments or drops to help clear the infection.

For more severe or recurrent cases, oral antibiotics may be prescribed.

While styes are usually harmless and resolve on their own, they can be uncomfortable. Home remedies, such as warm compresses, good eyelid hygiene, and avoiding squeezing or popping the stye, are often effective in alleviating symptoms. If symptoms persist or worsen, or if there are signs of spreading infection, it’s advisable to seek medical attention for further evaluation and potential treatment.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a stye?

A stye, or hordeolum, is a localized infection or inflammation of the eyelid, typically caused by bacterial infection, often involving the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria.

Styes are commonly caused by a bacterial infection, often associated with the Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. The infection usually occurs when bacteria enter oil glands or hair follicles on the eyelid.

Common symptoms include redness, swelling, tenderness, pain, excessive tearing, sensitivity to light, a visible bump on the eyelid, and sometimes crusting or discharge.

A healthcare professional typically diagnoses a stye based on a physical examination of the eye and eyelid. No additional diagnostic tests are usually needed.

Styes themselves are not typically contagious, but the bacteria causing the infection can be spread from person to person through direct contact.

Home remedies include applying warm compresses to the affected eyelid, practicing good eyelid hygiene, avoiding squeezing or popping the stye, and avoiding the use of eye makeup during the infection.